hype.co: Login | Sign Up
SkeletonCrew

SkeletonCrew

Royal Oak, United States

This not-so-stereotypical Detroit band has enjoyed a wealth of accolades bestowed on them by their hometown in recent years. The band garnering top honors at The Motor City Music Awards as “Band of The Year” and pre-historic...dig! was named “Best Pop/Rock Record.” As performers, Skeleton Crew has opened shows for such diverse acts as: The Rembrandts, the Smithereens, Robert Palmer, Todd Rundgren, Tesla, Kenny Loggins, Foreigner and Eddie Money. Venues have ranged from 2000- seaters, to the outdoor DTE Energy Music Theatre in Clarkston, Michigan, Tiger Stadium in Detroit and The Palace of Auburn Hills arena. Skeleton Crew® also merits a musical footnote in the career of superstar Beyonce Knowles as being “that scary band” that defeated the then 12-year and her group Girl Tyme on Ed McMahon’s Star Search. Skeleton Crew® digital downloads are available from Amazon.com at: http://www.amazon.com/Skeleton-Crew/e/B002NV0FFO/ref=ntt_dp_epwcd_0  

https://hype.co/skeletoncrew
  • By SkeletonCrew (Aug. 1, 2010, 8 p.m.)

    The celebrated author, H.G. Wells once wrote: “The past is but a beginning of a beginning.” In pre-historic...dig!, the debut album by Skeleton Crew, Mr. Wells’ profundity becomes embodied in a musical testimonial that’s just that; original songs of far-reaching lyrical and musical depth, vivid panoramic imagery, and an arrangement strewn with the subtle haunting of a familiar friend. Pre-historic...dig!, and its “power acoustic”-based sound bars any formal labeling and transcends musical typecasting. Songs such as: “callalili,” “in sympathy,” “kiss the world goodbye,” and “everything a man can bring” flirt with the band’s pop sensibilities. The country-tinged ballad “we ought to know better” takes a nod from Nashville, while “trumpeting soul” – aided by legendary trumpeter Johnny Trudell (Sinatra, Streisand, Motown) – pays homage to Louis Armstrong and New Orleans’ jazz. The ballad “sentimental” and the album’s epic finale “lost my way” round off the band’s eclectic leanings. The late great Detroit Free Press feature writer Bob Talbert noted in a past column that: “pre-historic...dig! is one of the best albums I’ve heard in years. The group’s terrific harmony and brilliant musicianship on original songs bring to mind both the Eagles and The Beatles.” No surprise since Skeleton Crew’s inclusion of John Lennon’s “I’am The Walrus” may have contributed in the comparison to the later. Nationally recognized music writer and recording artist in his own right, Stewart Francke (Detroit News, CD Review, The Boston Phoenix, Minneapolis City Pages, Detroit Metro Times), writes of pre-histoirc…dig!: It’s certainly the most melodically sophisticated and emotionally comprehensive statement in recent memory.” Francke goes on to say that: “Like other most capable pop miniaturists (Jimmy Webb, Roy Orbison, Paul McCartney), Skeleton Crew writes songs rich in both romantic possibility and quotidian detail.”

  • By SkeletonCrew (Aug. 1, 2010, 8 p.m.)

    The celebrated author, H.G. Wells once wrote: “The past is but a beginning of a beginning.” In pre-historic...dig!, the debut album by Skeleton Crew, Mr. Wells’ profundity becomes embodied in a musical testimonial that’s just that; original songs of far-reaching lyrical and musical depth, vivid panoramic imagery, and an arrangement strewn with the subtle haunting of a familiar friend. Pre-historic...dig!, and its “power acoustic”-based sound bars any formal labeling and transcends musical typecasting. Songs such as: “callalili,” “in sympathy,” “kiss the world goodbye,” and “everything a man can bring” flirt with the band’s pop sensibilities. The country-tinged ballad “we ought to know better” takes a nod from Nashville, while “trumpeting soul” – aided by legendary trumpeter Johnny Trudell (Sinatra, Streisand, Motown) – pays homage to Louis Armstrong and New Orleans’ jazz. The ballad “sentimental” and the album’s epic finale “lost my way” round off the band’s eclectic leanings. The late great Detroit Free Press feature writer Bob Talbert noted in a past column that: “pre-historic...dig! is one of the best albums I’ve heard in years. The group’s terrific harmony and brilliant musicianship on original songs bring to mind both the Eagles and The Beatles.” No surprise since Skeleton Crew’s inclusion of John Lennon’s “I’am The Walrus” may have contributed in the comparison to the later. Nationally recognized music writer and recording artist in his own right, Stewart Francke (Detroit News, CD Review, The Boston Phoenix, Minneapolis City Pages, Detroit Metro Times), writes of pre-histoirc…dig!: It’s certainly the most melodically sophisticated and emotionally comprehensive statement in recent memory.” Francke goes on to say that: “Like other most capable pop miniaturists (Jimmy Webb, Roy Orbison, Paul McCartney), Skeleton Crew writes songs rich in both romantic possibility and quotidian detail.”

  • By SkeletonCrew (Aug. 1, 2010, 8 p.m.)

    The celebrated author, H.G. Wells once wrote: “The past is but a beginning of a beginning.” In pre-historic...dig!, the debut album by Skeleton Crew, Mr. Wells’ profundity becomes embodied in a musical testimonial that’s just that; original songs of far-reaching lyrical and musical depth, vivid panoramic imagery, and an arrangement strewn with the subtle haunting of a familiar friend. Pre-historic...dig!, and its “power acoustic”-based sound bars any formal labeling and transcends musical typecasting. Songs such as: “callalili,” “in sympathy,” “kiss the world goodbye,” and “everything a man can bring” flirt with the band’s pop sensibilities. The country-tinged ballad “we ought to know better” takes a nod from Nashville, while “trumpeting soul” – aided by legendary trumpeter Johnny Trudell (Sinatra, Streisand, Motown) – pays homage to Louis Armstrong and New Orleans’ jazz. The ballad “sentimental” and the album’s epic finale “lost my way” round off the band’s eclectic leanings. The late great Detroit Free Press feature writer Bob Talbert noted in a past column that: “pre-historic...dig! is one of the best albums I’ve heard in years. The group’s terrific harmony and brilliant musicianship on original songs bring to mind both the Eagles and The Beatles.” No surprise since Skeleton Crew’s inclusion of John Lennon’s “I’am The Walrus” may have contributed in the comparison to the later. Nationally recognized music writer and recording artist in his own right, Stewart Francke (Detroit News, CD Review, The Boston Phoenix, Minneapolis City Pages, Detroit Metro Times), writes of pre-histoirc…dig!: It’s certainly the most melodically sophisticated and emotionally comprehensive statement in recent memory.” Francke goes on to say that: “Like other most capable pop miniaturists (Jimmy Webb, Roy Orbison, Paul McCartney), Skeleton Crew writes songs rich in both romantic possibility and quotidian detail.”

  • By SkeletonCrew (Aug. 1, 2010, 8 p.m.)

    The celebrated author, H.G. Wells once wrote: “The past is but a beginning of a beginning.” In pre-historic...dig!, the debut album by Skeleton Crew, Mr. Wells’ profundity becomes embodied in a musical testimonial that’s just that; original songs of far-reaching lyrical and musical depth, vivid panoramic imagery, and an arrangement strewn with the subtle haunting of a familiar friend. Pre-historic...dig!, and its “power acoustic”-based sound bars any formal labeling and transcends musical typecasting. Songs such as: “callalili,” “in sympathy,” “kiss the world goodbye,” and “everything a man can bring” flirt with the band’s pop sensibilities. The country-tinged ballad “we ought to know better” takes a nod from Nashville, while “trumpeting soul” – aided by legendary trumpeter Johnny Trudell (Sinatra, Streisand, Motown) – pays homage to Louis Armstrong and New Orleans’ jazz. The ballad “sentimental” and the album’s epic finale “lost my way” round off the band’s eclectic leanings. The late great Detroit Free Press feature writer Bob Talbert noted in a past column that: “pre-historic...dig! is one of the best albums I’ve heard in years. The group’s terrific harmony and brilliant musicianship on original songs bring to mind both the Eagles and The Beatles.” No surprise since Skeleton Crew’s inclusion of John Lennon’s “I’am The Walrus” may have contributed in the comparison to the later. Nationally recognized music writer and recording artist in his own right, Stewart Francke (Detroit News, CD Review, The Boston Phoenix, Minneapolis City Pages, Detroit Metro Times), writes of pre-histoirc…dig!: It’s certainly the most melodically sophisticated and emotionally comprehensive statement in recent memory.” Francke goes on to say that: “Like other most capable pop miniaturists (Jimmy Webb, Roy Orbison, Paul McCartney), Skeleton Crew writes songs rich in both romantic possibility and quotidian detail.”

  • more

Comments (0)